Rehabilitation Research and Practice
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Acceptance rate18%
Submission to final decision89 days
Acceptance to publication51 days
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Physiotherapists’ Experiences Using the Ekso Bionic Exoskeleton with Patients in a Neurological Rehabilitation Hospital: A Qualitative Study

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Rehabilitation Research and Practice publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of physical medicine and rehabilitation.

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Rehabilitation Research and Practice maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Advancing Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy Practice in a Developing Country: Surveying and Benchmarking

Management of noncommunicable diseases requires the adoption of multidisciplinary interventions that targets the modification of risk factors. Cardiovascular and respiratory diseases are amongst the four main killers of noncommunicable diseases. Physiotherapists specializing in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy are in a critical position in the management of health behaviors associated with noncommunicable diseases. However, the current context of health service in Jordan does not provide sufficient support and recognition for the delivery of specialized physiotherapy services. Objectives. The primary aim of this study was to describe cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service in Jordan. The secondary aims of this study were to: (i) Identify benchmarks from international contexts and guidelines for the delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. (ii) Identify gaps and areas for development in the current delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. Methods. This two phase study included a survey and a conceptual review with benchmarking. Following ethics approval, a cross sectional survey of physiotherapists practicing in Jordan was conducted. In phase 1, a survey was developed to describe the relevant dimensions of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. In phase 2 a conceptual review of the literature was performed to identify domains of service delivery and criteria required for optimal delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. In the discussion we integrated the results of the survey within the benchmarks that emerged from the conceptual review of literature in order to identify gaps and areas for development in the current delivery of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy service. Results. Phase 1: Data emerging from the survey suggests that Physiotherapists in Jordan lack training and autonomy, preventing them from acquiring advanced roles particularly cardiorespiratory physiotherapy that requires specialised knowledge and skills. The current delivery of the service is limited to acute interventions, and is based on limited, unstructured referral from physicians depriving the patients from the service. The context of health service in Jordan does not provide sufficient recognition for physiotherapy; neither does it support the delivery of multidisciplinary interventions by appropriate regulations and policies. Phase 2: The following three domains emerged from the literature and were used for describing cardiorespiratory physiotherapy in Jordan: people, scope of practice, and context of practice. Conclusion. Advancing practice requires developing competencies relevant to cardiorespiratory physiotherapy particularly diagnosis, health promotion, and prevention. It is recommended that health authorities should develop regulations and policies that promote the recognition and integration of physiotherapists in the healthcare system, as well as facilitating the implementation of patient centred, multidisciplinary interventions.

Clinical Study

Wearing Time of Ankle-Foot Orthoses with Modular Shank Supply in Cerebral Palsy: A Descriptive Analysis in a Clinically Prospective Approach

Objective. To date there is only limited knowledge about the wearing time of orthoses. Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) have not been studied with this research question. Additional influences of the orthotic design as well as weekdays and the weekend are also unknown. Design. Monocentric, clinically prospective intervention study. Patients. Inclusion of 10 patients with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy. Methods. Equipment of all subjects with a dynamic ankle-foot orthosis (DAFO) and modular shank supply (MSS, dynamic elastic shank adaptation or ground reaction AFO). Integration of temperature sensors for recording the wearing time for a period of 3 months. Results. The actual wearing time was below the recommendations on actually worn days as well as the average of the entire study period. In addition, the actual usage in terms of days and hours was well below the recommendations. The wearing time showed differences between weekdays and weekend. Differences between DAFO and MSS were not detectable. Conclusion. The actual usage behavior of ankle-foot orthoses differs from the recommendations of the prescriber. This applies to both DAFOs and modular use with shank supplies. Environmental factors may have a significant impact on wearing times on weekdays and the weekend.

Research Article

Screening and Early Identification of Spinal Deformities and Posture in 311 Children: Results from 16 Districts in Slovakia

Objective. In our study, we wanted to identify the number of existing deformities of the spine and posture in primary schoolers. Methods. The sample consisted of 311 healthy pupils aged 6-7. We used Klein, Thomas, and Mayer method to evaluate the posture. The spine curvature was evaluated by plumb line. Muscle imbalance was evaluated by standardized manual tests by Professor Janda. The results were evaluated by the basic population abundance and the use of the ANOVA program. We determined the level of statistical significance at p = 0.05. Results. The statistically significant occurrence of poor posture was found. Poor posture occurred in more than 50% of the pupils studied. Spine deformities in the sagittal plane have exceeded 30% (C = 37.94212%; Th = 32.15434%; L = 30.22508%). In the frontal plane deformities were present in 13.18328% of pupils. Spinae and postural disorders were accompanied by the muscle imbalance (muscle stiffness and weakness). Conclusion. Screening is a well-founded technique for the early detection of spinae and posture disorders. Based on the results of screening, professionals can take preventive measures. As in our research prevalence of spine deformities and poor posture in children was high, we recommend regular screening in clinical practice.

Research Article

Effects of Local Ischemic Compression on Upper Limb Latent Myofascial Trigger Points: A Study of Subjective Pain and Linear Motor Performance

Objective. To analyse the effect of the manual ischemic compression (IC) on the upper limb motor performance (MP) in patients with LTrPs. Materials and Methods. A quasiexperimental study was performed in twenty subjects allocated to either patients group with LTrPs (PG, n=10) or healthy group with no symptoms (HG, n=10). Subjective pain and linear MP (movement time and Fitts’ Law) were assessed before and after a linear tapping task. Data were analysed with mixed factorial ANOVA for intergroup linear motor performance differences and dependent t-student test for intragroup pain differences. Results. PG had a linear MP lower than the HG before treatment (p < 0.05). After IC, the PG showed a significant decrease of pain (4.07 ± 1.91 p < 0.001). Furthermore, the movement time (15.70 ± 2.05 p < 0.001) and the Fitts’ Law coefficient (0.80 ± 0.53 p < 0.001) were significantly reduced. However, one IC session did not allow the PG to get the same MP than the HG (p < 0.05). Conclusion. The results suggest the IC effectiveness on pain and MP impairment in subjects with LTrPs. However, the MP of these patients is only partially improved after the IC application.

Research Article

Influence of Chronic Stroke on Functional Arm Reaching: Quantifying Deficits in the Ipsilesional Upper Extremity

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to quantify ipsilesional upper extremity (UE) stand-reaching performance (kinematics and kinetics) among chronic stroke survivors. Method. Community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors (n=13) and age-similar healthy adults (n=13) performed flexion- and abduction-reaching tasks. Surface EMG and acceleration were sampled using wireless sensors from the prime movers (anterior and middle deltoid) and provided performance-outcome (reaction time, burst duration, movement time, and movement initiation time) and performance-production (peak acceleration) measures and were then evaluated. Results. Individuals with chronic stroke demonstrated significantly reduced performance outcomes (i.e., longer reaction time, burst duration, movement time, and movement initiation time) and performance production ability (i.e., smaller peak acceleration) compared to their healthy counterparts (p < 0.05) for both flexion- and abduction-reaching movements. Conclusion. Our results are suggestive of post-stroke deficits in ipsilesional motor execution during a stand-reaching task. Based on these findings, it is essential to integrate ipsilesional UE training into rehabilitation interventions as this might aid functional reaching activities of daily living and could ultimately help community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors maintain their independent living.

Research Article

Acute Effects of Assisted Cycling Therapy on Post-Stroke Motor Function: A Pilot Study

Background. Stroke is the most common cause of long-term disability in the United States (US). Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) at cadences of about 80 rpm has been associated with improvements in motor and clinical function in other clinical populations. The acute effects of ACT on motor function of persons with stroke have not been investigated. Objectives. The primary purpose of this cross-over trial was to compare the effects of ACT, voluntary cycling (VC), and no cycling (NC) on upper (Box and Blocks Test) and lower extremity motor function (Lower Extremity Motor Coordination Test) in adults with chronic stroke (age: 60 ± 16 years; months since stroke: 96 ± 85). The secondary purpose was to examine average cycling cadence and ratings of perceived exertion as predictors of change in motor function following the exercise session. Methods. Twenty-two participants (female = 6, male = 16) completed one 20-min session each of ACT (mean cadence = 79.5 rpm, VC (mean cadence = 51.5 rpm), and NC on separate days in quasi-counterbalanced fashion). Results. Main effects of intervention did not differ between ACT and VC. Within-intervention analyses revealed significant (p < 0.05) pre- to posttest changes in all outcome measures for ACT but only in the Lower Extremity Motor Coordination Test on the non-paretic side for VC. Trend analyses revealed a positive relationship between average ACT cadences and improvements in upper and lower extremity motor function (p < 0.05). A positive relationship between average VC cadences and lower extremity function was also revealed (p < 0.05). Conclusion. ACT and VC produced similar acute improvements in paretic and non-paretic lower extremity motor function whereas changes in upper extremity motor function were more limited. Faster cycling cadences seem to be associated with greater acute effects.

Rehabilitation Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate18%
Submission to final decision89 days
Acceptance to publication51 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit

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