Journal of Diabetes Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision90 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore3.020
Impact Factor3.040
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Incidence and Time Trends of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Adults in Zhejiang Province, China, 2007-2017

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 Journal profile

Journal of Diabetes Research publishes articles related to type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Topics include etiology, pathogenesis, management, and prevention of diabetes, as well as associated complications such as nephropathy.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Dr Mark Yorek, from the University of Iowa, is currently researching vascular and neural disease related to obesity and diabetes. His active research studies focus on etiology, treatment and prevention of nerve damage.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Supplementation with Korean Red Ginseng Improves Current Perception Threshold in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Background. Many Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients in Korea take Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) for various reasons. In this study, we investigated the effects of KRG administration on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in T2DM patients. Methods. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were randomly allocated to either the placebo or KRG group and took corresponding tablets for 24 weeks. The primary outcomes were changes in current perception threshold (CPT) at week 24. Secondary outcomes were altered fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and various metabolic and inflammatory markers at week 24. Results. Sixty-one patients completed the study. The CPT of the lower extremities at various frequencies exhibited significant improvements at week 24 in the KRG group. Other metabolic parameters were not altered after 24 weeks in both groups. In the subgroup analysis, CPT levels were improved in those with a longer diabetes duration or who already had neuropathy at the beginning of the study, and insulin resistance was improved in patients with a shorter diabetes duration. Conclusion. Twenty-four week administration of KRG in T2DM patients resulted in a significant improvement in neuropathy, especially in those with a longer diabetes duration. A further, larger population study with a longer follow-up period is warranted to verify the effects of KRG on diabetic neuropathy.

Review Article

The Threshold of the Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy below Which Intensive Glycemic Control Is Beneficial in Diabetic Patients: Estimation Using Data from Large Randomized Clinical Trials

Intensive glucose therapy can protect the retina of individuals with diabetes, but it is unknown if it provides the same protection to patients with different severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We finally included DR-related studies involving intensive glucose control with large sample size and long follow-up time, including five large and high-quality randomized clinical trials (RCTs): DCCT, UKPDS, ACCORD, AdRem, and VADT. With DCCT as a reference, we supposed a DR severity threshold that is verified by other RCTs then. We found that individuals who have DR lesions that are equivalent to or less severe than moderate NPDR achieve benefits for the retina by intensive glycemic control. However, these are realized only if the HbA1c in type 1 or type 2 diabetic patients is reduced at least by 0.8% versus the control group or it is reduced to <7% and >3 years of intensive glucose control is required. If the severity of DR lesions is worse than moderate NPDR, intensive glycemic control may not bring benefits.

Research Article

Pleiotropic Effects of a KCNQ1 Variant on Lipid Profiles and Type 2 Diabetes: A Family-Based Study in China

Objective. The genetic variant rs2237895, located in the Potassium Voltage-Gated Channel Subfamily Q Member 1 (KCNQ1) gene, has been replicated to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) susceptibility, but the relationship with lipids is conflicting. Furthermore, the common genetic predisposition to T2DM and lipids was not fully detected. Methods. In total, 5839 individuals (2220 were T2DM patients) across 2885 families were included. The effect of rs2237895 on T2DM and lipids was estimated using linear regression and logistic regression models after adjustment for multiple covariates. Mediation analysis was then used to test whether KCNQ1 participated in T2DM pathogenesis via lipid-mediated pathways. Results. Per allele-C of rs2237895 was associated with 17% (11-23%, ) increased T2DM risk. Moreover, it was correlated with 5% (1-9%, ), 4% (1-7%, ), 2% (0-3%, ), and 2% (0-3%, ) higher total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B (Apo-B) concentrations, respectively. Nevertheless, the genetic susceptibility for higher T2DM risk was correlated with higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level (2%, 0-3%, ). Mediation analysis showed only TC, LDL-C, and Apo-B had small significant mediated effects, with 2.9%, 2.3%, and 3.1% of the total effects of rs2237895 on T2DM being mediated by them, respectively. Conclusion. KCNQ1 had pleiotropic effects on lipids and T2DM, and the unexpected genetic effect on association of HDL-C with T2DM was observed, indicating the different pathways to lipids and T2DM. Further research studies are needed to verify potential biological mechanisms.

Research Article

Relationship between Urinary Liver-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein (L-FABP) and Sarcopenia in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Fatty Rats

Background. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a known risk factor for diabetic kidney disease (DKD) and sarcopenia in older patients. Because there may be an interaction between DKD and sarcopenia, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between urinary levels of liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sarcopenia using a novel rat model of T2D. Methods. Male spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rats () at 16 weeks of age were used as an animal model of T2D. Age- and sex-matched Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats () were used as controls. Urine samples were obtained from the rats, and muscle strength was evaluated with the use of the forelimb grip test at 16, 20, and 24 weeks of age. Serum, kidney, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle samples were collected at 24 weeks of age. Urinary L-FABP levels were measured using dedicated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results. Increased urinary L-FABP levels, focal glomerular sclerosis, moderate interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, and accumulation of renal oxidative proteins were significantly observed in the SDT fatty rats, compared to the SD rats. Muscle weight, muscle strength, cross-sectional areas of both type I and type IIb muscle fibers, and increasing rate of muscle strength were significantly decreased in the SDT fatty rats compared to the SD rats at 24 weeks. Urinary L-FABP levels at 20 and 24 weeks were significantly negatively correlated with muscle strength. Urinary L-FABP levels at 16 weeks were significantly negatively correlated with the increasing rate of muscle strength. Conclusions. Urinary L-FABP reflects the degree of muscle strength and weight, as well as cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers. Although further clinical study is needed, urinary L-FABP may be useful to monitor the progression of sarcopenia and DKD in T2D patients.

Research Article

Effects of the Proactive Interdisciplinary Self-Management (PRISMA) Program on Online Care Platform Usage in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Online care platforms can support patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in managing their health. However, in the use of eHealth, a low participation rate is common. The Proactive Interdisciplinary Self-Management (PRISMA) program, aimed at improving patients’ self-management skills, was expected to encourage patients to manage their disease through the use of an online platform. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to investigate whether a group education program can improve the use of an online care platform in patients with T2DM treated by primary care providers in the Netherlands. In a randomized controlled trial, patients with T2DM received either PRISMA with usual care or usual care only. During a six-month follow-up period in 2014-2015, usage (number of log-ons and time spent per session) of an online care platform (e-Vita) aimed at improving T2DM self-management was assessed. A training about the functionalities of e-Vita was offered. The sample consisted of 203 patients. No differences were found between the intervention and control groups in the number of patients who attended the platform training (interested patients) (; ), and the number of patients who logged on at least once (platform users) (; ). In addition, no differences were found between the groups in the type of users—patients who logged on twice or more (active users) or patients who logged on once (nonactive users) (; ). The PRISMA program did not change platform usage in patients with T2DM. In addition, only a small proportion of the patients logged on twice or more. Patients probably need other encouragements to manage their condition using an online platform.

Research Article

Association of Glycated Proteins with Inflammatory Proteins and Periodontal Disease Parameters

Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory condition that may contribute to diabetogenesis. The aim was to investigate the levels of glycated proteins and their correlation with periodontal and systemic inflammation. Fifty-one patients with periodontitis and 20 healthy subjects underwent probing pocket depth (PPD) measurements. PPD total and PPD disease with and without tooth adjustment were used as continuous indices. Marginal bone loss (MBL) for mandibular premolars and molars was measured digitally. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were also analyzed. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fructosamine (FrAm) levels were measured in all subjects. A multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) was used to analyze the serum samples for simultaneous measurement of 92 proteins. Both HbA1c and FrAm inversely correlated with IL-10, FGF-21, MCP-1, and TNF beta amongst 16 proteins. HbA1c correlated directly with OPG. Parameters of disease severity were consistently significant for HbA1c. Adjusted PPD total and number of missing teeth were increased in diabetes whereas levels of RANKL and RANKL to OPG ratio were the highest in nondiabetic periodontitis patients. Hyperglycemic conditions in periodontitis patients are associated with reduced levels of anti-inflammatory proteins as well as dysregulated bone resorption.

Journal of Diabetes Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision90 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore3.020
Impact Factor3.040
 Submit

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