Journal of Aging Research

Aging in Place in Late Life: Theory, Methodology, and Intervention


Publishing date
15 Nov 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
15 May 2011

1Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden

2Interdisciplinary Ageing Research, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Goethe University Frankfurt, Robert-Mayer-Str. 1, 60325 Frankfurt, Germany

3Ageing, Work & Health Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia


Aging in Place in Late Life: Theory, Methodology, and Intervention

Description

Ageing in place is about being able to continue living in one's own home and to adapt to changing needs. The issue of aging in place is of high concern due to the increasing number of old and very old people in western societies. With increasing age, the home becomes more important and in very late life, a substantial portion of daily life takes places within the home and its close surroundings. Living a life in a suitable and meaningful home environment is known to affect independence, participation, and health positively while the home and neighborhood environments also can pose a risk to health and future expectations in late life. Due to factors such as the diversity in socioeconomic status, health status, social and cultural traditions, as well as physical and geographical conditions, both within and between countries, the issue of ageing in place in late life is very complex. Although a basic understanding of aging in place may derive from Environmental Gerontology, ageing in place needs to be studied from different perspectives involving different disciplines in order to get the full picture of the person-environment-activity relationship and to have an impact on policy and planning of housing and social support services.

We invite authors to contribute original research papers as well as review papers that will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the different aspects of ageing in place in late life. We particularly welcome papers that contribute to the development, testing, and use of theory and methodology to understand and investigate ageing in place in late life. We also welcome papers that focus on the translation and implementation of research results into social policy and planning on individual, group, and population levels in relation to late life. Papers that synthesize currently available research focusing on ageing in place in late life are also of high interest. Researches using novel approaches for the integration of different methods, such as quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods are especially welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of the physical, social, and cultural home and neighborhood environments for successful adaptation and ageing in place in late life, as well as the home and neighborhood environments as potential barriers to ageing in place
  • Theories focusing on relationships and transactions between the aging person, the home and neighborhood environments, and activity/participation in late life
  • Methodology development of ageing-in-place-related facets and aspects
  • Strategies for translation and implementation of research results into policy and practice focusing on ageing in place, nationally and internationally
  • Professional training and education related to ageing in place in late life

Articles published in this special issue will not be subject to the journal's Article Processing Charges.

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jar/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 547562
  • - Editorial

Aging in Place in Late Life: Theory, Methodology, and Intervention

Agneta Malmgren Fänge | Frank Oswald | Lindy Clemson
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 360254
  • - Research Article

Is Collective Efficacy Age Graded? The Development and Evaluation of a New Measure of Collective Efficacy for Older Adults

Adena M. Galinsky | Kathleen A. Cagney | Christopher R. Browning
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 139523
  • - Research Article

Older People and Social Connectedness: How Place and Activities Keep People Engaged

Irene H. Yen | Janet K. Shim | ... | Judith C. Barker
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 797023
  • - Research Article

Negotiating the Joint Career: Couples Adapting to Alzheimer's and Aging in Place

Renée L. Beard | Sasha Sakhtah | ... | James E. Galvin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 173247
  • - Research Article

The Importance of Social Connectedness in Building Age-Friendly Communities

Charles A. Emlet | Joane T. Moceri
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 659806
  • - Research Article

Families, Friends, and the Neighborhood of Older Adults: Evidence from Public Housing in Singapore

Treena Wu | Angelique Chan
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 120952
  • - Research Article

Aging in Place: Evolution of a Research Topic Whose Time Has Come

Sarinnapha Vasunilashorn | Bernard A. Steinman | ... | Jon Pynoos
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 625758
  • - Research Article

Home and Community Environmental Features, Activity Performance, and Community Participation among Older Adults with Functional Limitations

Hsiang-Yu Yang | Jon A. Sanford
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 590724
  • - Research Article

Dementia Home Care Resources: How Are We Managing?

Catherine Ward-Griffin | Jodi Hall | ... | Marita Klosek
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 148287
  • - Research Article

Revisiting the Role of Neighbourhood Change in Social Exclusion and Inclusion of Older People

Victoria F. Burns | Jean-Pierre Lavoie | Damaris Rose
Journal of Aging Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate27%
Submission to final decision114 days
Acceptance to publication46 days
CiteScore1.680
Impact Factor-
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