International Journal of Hepatology

Advances in Alcoholic Liver Disease


Publishing date
01 Dec 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
01 Jun 2011

Lead Editor

1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Liver Study Unit, Omaha Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA

2Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA

3Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Disorders Laboratory, Cannon Research Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA

4Liver Study Unit, Omaha Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA


Advances in Alcoholic Liver Disease

Description

Multiple factors/mechanisms are involved in ALD pathogenesis. Alcoholic liver injury can lead to a broad range of liver abnormalities. Alcohol is primarily metabolized in the hepatocyte leading to increased secretion of inflammatory mediators which, in turn, activate and/or influence the response of the nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) (hepatic stellate cells, Kupffer cells, and sinusoidal endothelial cells) and subsequently degree of liver injury. Liver also serves as immune organ and accommodates a wide variety of cells, including immune cells. The latter includes dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells, and lymphocytes that are present in normal livers. Selective recruitment and retention of certain immune populations occur during diverse liver diseases, and these cells play a critical role in development and resolution of liver inflammation, remodeling, and destruction. In addition, liver cells are known to actively participate in immune defense. One of the mechanisms which affects various liver cell types and affects disease progression is an impairment of methylation reactions. The various biological functions that are modulated by methylation reactions include proteasome functions, antigen presentation, interferon signaling, intracellular fat mobilization, cell signaling, apoptosis control, and epigenetic changes in hepatocytes. Hepatic stellate cell activation and TNFα expression in macrophages are other phenomena that appear to be affected by alterations in methylation reactions. In addition, inclusion of treatment modalities with betaine and SAM, two agents that can correct methylation defects to attenuate many ethanol-induced liver changes, will also be solicited.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that cover these aspects of ALD. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Nonparenchymal cells in development and progression of ALD
  • Modulation of fibrogenic gene expression
  • HSC transdifferentiation, matrix remodeling, reversal of HSC to quiescent state
  • Liver as immune organ: implications for alcohol-induced liver pathology
  • The mechanisms of recruitment, trafficking, retention, and activity of immune cells to the liver
  • The role of miRNA and other small RNAs in the regulation of gene expression in ALD
  • Methylation defects in ALD: pathogenesis and treatment

Articles published in this special issue will not be subject to the journal's Article Processing Charges.

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijhep/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 563018
  • - Editorial

Advances in Alcoholic Liver Disease

Natalia Osna | Kusum Kharbanda | ... | Angela Dolganiuc
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 978136
  • - Research Article

Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Impaired Fat Efflux in Polarized Hepatic Cells: Consequences of Ethanol Metabolism

Benita L. McVicker | Karuna Rasineni | ... | Carol A. Casey
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 853175
  • - Review Article

Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: Essential Partners in Alcoholic Liver Disease

Aditya Ambade | Pranoti Mandrekar
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 231210
  • - Research Article

Markers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Alcoholic Hepatitis and Viral Hepatitis C

Manuela G. Neuman | Hemda Schmilovitz-Weiss | ... | Lawrence Cohen
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 954157
  • - Research Article

Cyanamide Potentiates the Ethanol-Induced Impairment of Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in a Recombinant Hepatic Cell Line Expressing Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activity

Dahn L. Clemens | Dean J. Tuma | Carol A. Casey
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 498232
  • - Review Article

MicroRNA Signature in Alcoholic Liver Disease

Shashi Bala | Gyongyi Szabo
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 962183
  • - Research Article

Betaine Treatment Attenuates Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Alterations to the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Proteome

Kusum K. Kharbanda | Sandra L. Todero | ... | Shannon M. Bailey
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 408190
  • - Research Article

Dose-Dependent Change in Elimination Kinetics of Ethanol due to Shift of Dominant Metabolizing Enzyme from ADH 1 (Class I) to ADH 3 (Class III) in Mouse

Takeshi Haseba | Kouji Kameyama | ... | Youkichi Ohno
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 307165
  • - Review Article

Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells in the Treatment of Chronic Liver Disease

Madhava Pai | Duncan Spalding | ... | Nagy Habib
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 459278
  • - Research Article

Alcohol Activates TGF-Beta but Inhibits BMP Receptor-Mediated Smad Signaling and Smad4 Binding to Hepcidin Promoter in the Liver

Lisa Nicole Gerjevic | Na Liu | ... | Duygu Dee Harrison-Findik
International Journal of Hepatology
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Acceptance to publication22 days
CiteScore2.280
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