Advances in Materials Science and Engineering

Alternative Cementitious Materials and Their Composites


Status
Published

1Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

2Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand

3Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia

4Hunan University, Changsha, China


Alternative Cementitious Materials and Their Composites

Description

Research and development of alternative cementitious materials became mandatory for construction industry to manage global warming as well as energy scarcity due to huge energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions entailed by conventional cement technology. Researchers are trying to replace Portland cement with low temperature cementitious materials such as special cement (e.g., calcium sulfoaluminate (Yelimite) and dicalcium silicate (Belite) cement) and geopolymeric binders. The benefits are not limited to energy savings and low carbon emissions. In fact, the alternative cement has promising properties that can overcome certain limitations of Portland cement. For example, shrinkage leading to cracks can be overcome using calcium sulfoaluminate cement; spalling of concrete during fire accidents can be minimized by geopolymeric cement. Therefore, binary and tertiary systems of cementitious materials (e.g., concrete) are being developed to achieve better properties for concrete and building materials. In addition to low CO2 emission and energy consumption of alternative cement production, recycling of wastes, such as combustion by-products and lime-rich sludge and slag, is also feasible. It, therefore, conveys an image of being environmentally friendly production.

Besides using alternative cement for traditional construction, its composites with other inorganic materials, like zeolites, nanoclays, clay minerals, carbon fibers, electroceramics, or even organic materials, can be smart building materials and work for many other applications (e.g., toxic waste encapsulation and environmental cleaning up). Alternative cementitious materials for constructions are not only limited to inorganic cement but also extended to organic binders used in the production of building materials. Durability of building materials made of alternative cementitious materials is a very important aspect related to economic and environmental issues. Therefore, research focusing on durability improvement of cementitious and building materials is essential for the future of construction industry.

This special issue will review the state of the art in the field of alternative cementitious materials and their composites.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Synthesis of special cement (Belite, Yelimite, etc.) and its composites
  • Synthesis of geopolymers and their composites
  • Admixture interaction, chemical reaction, phase development, and microstructures of alternative cementitious materials related to their performance and/or durability
  • Mechanical properties and/or durability of alternative cement and its composites
  • Modeling and simulation related to phase development and engineering properties of alternative cement and its composites
  • Functional properties and other specialties of alternative cement and its composites
  • Alternative cementitious materials blended with conventional cement
  • Organic binders and their composites
  • Building materials based on alternative cementitious materials and their composites
  • Environmental properties and perspectives of alternative cementitious materials

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 5074636
  • - Editorial

Alternative Cementitious Materials and Their Composites

K. Pimraksa | P. Chindaprasirt | ... | T.-C. Ling
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 4026127
  • - Research Article

Influence of Pb Dosage on Immobilization Characteristics of Different Types of Alkali-Activated Mixtures and Mortars

Jan Koplík | Jaromír Pořízka | ... | Matěj Březina
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 8373518
  • - Research Article

Improvement of the Early-Age Compressive Strength, Water Permeability, and Sulfuric Acid Resistance of Scoria-Based Mortars/Concrete Using Limestone Filler

Aref Al-Swaidani | Andraos Soud | Amina Hammami
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 6854043
  • - Research Article

Flexural Behaviour of Combined FA/GGBFS Geopolymer Concrete Beams after Exposure to Elevated Temperatures

Jun-ru Ren | Hui-guo Chen | ... | Miao-shuo Wang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 7139481
  • - Research Article

Long-Term Properties of Cement-Based Composites Incorporating Natural Zeolite as a Feature of Progressive Building Material

Alena Sičáková | Matej Špak | ... | Marek Kováč
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 8394834
  • - Research Article

The Role of Various Powders during the Hydration Process of Cement-Based Materials

Shuhua Liu | Hongling Wang | Jianpeng Wei
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 6849139
  • - Research Article

Development and Characterization of Norite-Based Cementitious Binder from an Ilmenite Mine Waste Stream

Mahmoud Khalifeh | Arild Saasen | ... | Helge Hodne
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 4724302
  • - Research Article

Optimising the Performance of Cement-Based Batteries

Aimee Byrne | Shane Barry | ... | Brian Norton
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 2394641
  • - Research Article

Properties and Internal Curing of Concrete Containing Recycled Autoclaved Aerated Lightweight Concrete as Aggregate

Teewara Suwan | Pitiwat Wattanachai
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 8631074
  • - Research Article

Effect of Calcined Hard Kaolin Dosage on the Strength Development of CPB of Fine Tailings with Sulphide

Juanrong Zheng | Lijie Guo | Zhenbo Zhao
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision80 days
Acceptance to publication33 days
CiteScore1.370
Impact Factor1.399
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